Blog

Educating the women of tomorrow

Activist, advocate, leader and United Nations youth advisor – this is Vivian Onano. Her passions are investing in young individuals and fighting for gender equality and government empowerment. Raised in Kisumu of Kenya, Vivian has always had a strong desire to learn and remains dedicated to the importance of education. Recently, we sat down with Vivian to find out more about her life, thoughts on women’s leadership and goals for the future.

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Having Your Period Shouldn’t Hold You Back

WaterAid Youth Ambassador Vivian Onano weighs in on menstrual taboos, girls' education and more on International Women's Day. Your period. Aunt Flow. That time of the month. Whatever you call it, menstruation is a reality for women and girls around the world. The average women will menstruate once a month, for roughly 35 to 40 years of her life. That’s approximately 3000 days—more than 8 years—of periods during her lifetime. At any given time, 800 million women and youth worldwide are menstruating.
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Investing in Our Future

A girl at Therisanyo Primary in Gaborone, Botswana. Photo credit: Paul Morse
A quality education provides a critical foundation for personal development as individuals and global citizens. Enabling young people to find their voice, self-confidence, and sense of community, education creates a ripple effect that improves well-being far beyond a single person.
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Make Sure Your Business Idea Is In Line With Your Passion

The inaugural event, with the theme, Awaken Your Curiosity, features an impressive array of speakers including US mogul and entrepreneur Russell Simmons; Nobel Prize-winner Wole Soyinka; founder of Black Girls Code Kimberly Bryant, who has been listed as one of the "25 Most Influential African-Americans In Technology"; CEO of Moving Brands Inc. Mat Heinl and What’s Your Moonshot? trend and innovation strategist, John Sanei.
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Michelle Obama asks women to support girls education abroad

First Lady Michelle Obama said Monday American women need to do more to help girls in African and Middle Eastern countries get an education. "We would never accept a life of dependence and abuse for our girls," Obama said during her speech at a lunch sponsored by MORE magazine. "We would never allow their bodies to be violated or for their potential to be squandered. We have to ask ourselves, 'Why would we accept this fate for any girl on this planet?'"
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Why is water so important to gender equality?

Investing in safe water for all saves lives and livelihoods, but it also has particular significance for girls and women. In honor of World Water Week taking place right now, Women Deliver spoke with Vivian Onano, a Women Deliver Young Leader and WaterAid's new Global Youth Ambassador to discuss how water and sanitation for health (WASH) are critical to achieving gender equality and improving the health, rights, and wellbeing of girls and women.

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Can young activists reform an old UN?

Will first-ever public debate bring more accountability to the United Nations’ top job?
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The First Lady Effect

At the age of 19 she became a mother. At 24, she worked as a listings assistant at the Namibian Stock Exchange to help fund her legal studies. She is a founding shareholder and Managing Director of Namibia’s first and largest private equity fund, and has served as a member of the former Namibian President’s Economic Advisory Council. Among a lengthy list of accolades over her 15 years in business, she is cited as the youngest laureate of the Namibian Business Hall of Fame.
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Young People at the Centre of Sustainable Development Goals

In early February, the United Nations Economic and Social Council (UN ECOSOC) hosted the annual Youth Forum to discuss what it will take to transition from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and youth involvement in the process. During the two days conference that brought together youth leaders and advocates from different countries and backgrounds, issues of access to quality education, peace and security, achieving gender equality and employment, were synonymous with every participant.
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Hacking The Parliament in Brazil

In 2013, for the first time Brazil hosted a hackathon to use technology to open up the legislative processes to the general population. This initiative was supported by the Brazilian Chamber of Deputies (Lower Congress) with the aim of increasing transparency and citizen engagement in the legislative processes. At the time of the hackathon in 2013, Brazil was already a member of the Open Government Partnership (OGP). It is a founding member since 2011 along other 7 countries namely: Indonesia, Mexico, Norway, the Philippines, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the USA. As a founding member, Brazil endorsed the OGP declaration and announced their action that led to government launching open data portals and publishing their data.
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